William Fields Fine Art

 
 
 

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William Fields

William Fields Fine Art

Hermann, MO

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William Fields, Artist
Two Soaring Hearts, LLC
www.2soaringhearts.com
P.O. Box 293
Hermann, MO 65041
phone: 573.486.5252 or 314.578.5767




Art is my passion. I try to put everything I have learned from every great teacher and through every mistake I have made into each and every piece with as much passion as I have for art and for life itself.

Artists have been accused of being self aggrandizing, long winded, name droppers. I hate it when the critics get it right! In an attempt to diffuse those kinds of accusations, regardless of how accurate they may be, I am writing this statement today.

Each picture I make begins with a germ of an idea. I visualize how I would like the finished picture to look. Once in awhile the end results match my original intent. I attempt to bring those concrete and abstract qualities that I have learned along the way into each image. I concern myself with composition; as wide a range of values as possible; the colors, hues, and intensity; the light, the subject matter especially and a balance of all these concepts.

My process is not overtly cognitive. I do not for example think each of these things out in a literal or verbal sense. It is analogous to hitting a tennis ball. One doesn’t think “Here comes the ball, I’m going to get ready to hit it and then here it is bouncing; now I’m going to hit it.” One just lines up and swings the racket. My approach to art is much the same way. I have all these concepts as part of my creative fabric. I just line myself up and make the picture. The difference between a snapshot and art is the years of practice and training that go passionately into each and every image. I would submit that you will find exactly that in my pictures. Yet, I am not a serious artist or rather I don’t take myself or anything else too seriously. I’m sure to get creamed for saying that, but the truth is, I am filled with laughter and joy and I work at bringing this approach to life into my work and in each thing I do each and every day. Just ask my wife.

My primary focus (intentional pun) today is in photography. I have owned a camera since about age 8. I have made pictures for myself and others for most of my recollected life. As a younger artist I concentrated on drawing and printmaking. I worked in etchings, lithography, wood and linoleum cuts. In my middle years I was a watercolor painter primarily. As an old man, I still paint and make prints but photography has become my obsession and passion. I attempt to make every picture tell a story. Some are plainly obvious by virtue of the subject matter. In others, there are shadings of emotion and feelings that are connected to my psyche and in many cases to that of the viewer. Consider these observations:

"The concept of art as a healing force is becoming part of the national lexicon.’

The Society of the Arts in Healthcare, Annual
Conference 2004

‘Nature is one of the most successful sources of positive distraction. Simply viewing a mural of a water scene has been shown to alter electrical activity in the brain, reduce levels of stress hormones and ease muscle tension.’

Roger Ulrich, Art In Healing 1984, Texas A&M University

‘If I find a green meadow splashed with daisies and sit down beside a clear-running brook, I have found medicine. It soothes my hurts as well as when I sat in my mother’s lap in infancy, because the Earth really is my mother, and the green meadow is her lap.’

Deepok Chopra

‘The art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician. Therefore the physician must start from nature, with an open mind.’

Philipus Aureolus Paracelsus

The above quotes verify the power of art as a curative force. There is overwhelming evidence documenting the healing effects of pictures portraying peaceful, realistic, nature scenes. One can tell from the sources quoted that this is not a new idea. The healing power of art has been recognized and proclaimed throughout the ages. Now, we have hard evidence that scientifically supports the efficacy of art as therapeutic. My work provides safe emotional haven and promotes healing on all levels. The images provide comfort and solace to those in both physical and emotional pain. The photos invite the viewer into a world of comfort and peace. They begin with intrinsic, aesthetic worth based on color, composition and value. Then, I ensure choices of subject matter to soothe the viewer. You are invited to add the healing power of art to your home, office or to any other space in which those who see the work will benefit from the silent language that speaks to us all.

I believe we are all connected in ways that aren't necessarily clear. Art can touch us and weave us together in ways that heal us. Please join me on my journey. You are most welcome here.

I will be happy to sign purchased prints or mattes at no additional cost, if the buyer pays shipping to and from my studio. For a small fee, I will draw in graphite, a remarque relating to the image on your matte. The same shipping conditions apply.

Education

University of Redlands
Redlands, CA
Bachelor of Arts
Other studies at Indiana University, Notre Dame University, UCLA and University of Southern California.
Studied with Milford Zornes, Ning Yeh and Gerald Brommer.

Exhibitions and other Exposure
My work is found in public and private collections including:

Collections and Installations
Set Decorations for Steven Spielberg’s “Seaquest”
Glendale Federal Bank (now California Federal Bank)
Greenpeace
Arthritis Foundation
Hermann Hill Vineyard and Inn
County of Los Angeles Public Library

Other
Arroyo Craftsman - South Pasadena, CA
Galerie Des Artisans - Glendale, CA
Horizons Gallery - Manhattan Beach, CA
Ashley Gallery - Sherman Oaks, CA
Renegade Gallery - Woodland Hills, CA
Topanga Gallery - Topanga, CA
Componere Gallery - St. Louis, MO
Cover of American Way (American Airlines) Magazine

Teaching
Los Angeles Valley College, Hermann Regional High School, Private Instruction

 

Tenente by William Fields

 

Hidden Among the Blackberries by William Fields

 

Rooms to Let Inca Style by William Fields

 

Out on T by William Fields

 

Wukoki Still Waits by William Fields

 

In the Orchard of the Artists by William Fields

 

The Four Directions by William Fields

 

In the Place of Na'ashjii Asdzaa by William Fields

 

Panguitch Homestead by William Fields

 

Preparing to Depart by William Fields

 

Spiraling Toward the Light by William Fields

 

Among Sacred Mesas by William Fields

 

A Glimmer on the Sky City by William Fields

 

Chaco Ventana by William Fields

 

Pretty Village Chaco by William Fields

 

A Dream Deferred by William Fields

 

White Pocket Dune by Dune by William Fields

 

White Pocket Corral by William Fields

 

Artist Point to Three Sisters by William Fields

 

The Face of Teton by William Fields

 

From Snow That Melted Only Yesterday by William Fields

 

Whose Woods These Are I Think I Know by William Fields

 

Arches within Arches by William Fields

 

Temple Canyon Creek by William Fields

 

In the Culebra by William Fields

 

Palace Picturesque by William Fields

 

Bright Angel Trails Off by William Fields

 

North Rim Aurora by William Fields

 

The Eat Rite Diner by William Fields

 

Ouray in Chinese Brush III by William Fields

 

Katy Sycamores by William Fields

 

Mists Upon the Crest by William Fields

 

The Colorado East of Moab by William Fields

 

Where Ancients Stood by William Fields

 

Mormon Tea and Mittens by William Fields

 

Hermannhof Festhalle by William Fields

 

The Rocking Horse Winner by William Fields

 

A Tree Poem in the Mist by William Fields

 

The Sky Tilts Down to the Canyon by William Fields

 

MD His Place by William Fields

 

Balancing Rocks Afar by William Fields

 

The Old Folks Are Gone Now by William Fields

 

We Had Cows in the Yard by William Fields

 

Moonrise Over the Bottoms, October by William Fields

 

Missouri Bottoms Indian Summer by William Fields

 

Lobo Yawns by William Fields

 

Downward Facing Wolf by William Fields

 

Down a Berger Lane by William Fields